8/20/10

State Bill 250 The Pet Responsibility Act It's Back & Need YOUR help!!!

We are still killing over 500,000 pets per year in our California.
PLEASE help us stop this horrendous situation.

Since 1/1/09- 820,236 reported Pets killed in CA shelters
$409,626,995.00 in taxes spent to house & Kill them

State Bill 250 The Pet Responsibility Act, is going to be brought up for a final vote on the Assembly floor by Assemblyman Blumenfield in the next day or two. We are asking again for pet lovers across California to help pass this bill into law!

SB250 timeline
Each year, over $250 million dollars is spent housing and euthanizing homeless dogs and cats in California. Approximately 1 million dogs and cats enter California’s shelters each year, and over half of them are euthanized (killed) simply because there are not enough homes.

This enormous number of homeless pets actually means that every dog born in the state of California today has nearly a 1 in 4 chance of ultimately becoming this enormous number of homeless pets actually means that every dog born in the state of California today has nearly a 1 in 4 chance of ultimately becoming homeless and dying in a shelter3. Two-thirds of the cats entering California shelters are euthanized. And, the number of dogs and cats entering our shelters is currently on the rise.

SB 250 provides a reasonable, fiscally responsible step towards reducing pet overpopulation in California. The bill simply requires that dogs be spayed or neutered unless their owner/guardian obtains an unaltered dog license when they license their animal.SB 250 also requires that roaming cats be spayed and neutered by their owner/guardian.

SB 250 The Pet Responsibility Act, is:

Fair. Licensed dogs may be left unaltered if the owner/ guardian chooses. Owners cited for violating local or state laws may have their license revoked or be required to spay or neuter.
Fiscally responsible. SB 250 saves the state millions of dollars by reducing homeless pets.
Proven. Spay and neuter laws have been shown effective for over 10 years. In one community, the number of homeless animals was reduced by over 60% after a similar law was implemented4.
Forward thinking. Similar spay and neuter legislation is currently being introduced across the country, as legislators nationwide confront the high costs associated with pet overpopulation.
Provides due process. A full and fair hearing process is provided for matters related to citations.
Flexible. License costs, fines and implementation details are at the discretion of local jurisdictions.
Widely supported. A diverse coalition of elected officials, law enforcement agencies, city and county agencies, humane societies and SPCAs, veterinarians and veterinary hospitals, national animal welfare organizations, California rescue organizations, and thousands of individuals and organizations support spay and neuter legislation like SB 250.

Please call your Assembly member TODAY, and if you cannot get through, please try again.
To Find YOUR Assembly member Click Here!





I don't want to breed..i want to live!
all i wanted was a home & love. no one loved me enough to help me have a life.

6 comments:

Geraldine Clarke said...

Judie Mancuso, the driving force behind SB250, got a similar law enacted in Los Angeles and, as a result, the numbers of animals killed in shelters there has skyrocketed.

SB250 will result in MORE animals being abandoned to shelters. This has happened EVERYWHERE mandatory neutering like SB250 has been enacted into law. SB250 is NOT a licensing law as is suggested in this article. This is a mandatory neutering law. The supposed licenses for intact animals will not be available in many areas and may, if available at all, come with draconian provisions. There are NO provision to protect working animals - service dogs, police dogs, search and rescue dogs, herding dogs, etc. and it will put any dog that has to work off leash at risk - yes, all those search and rescue and other dogs who we depend upon to do such great work for us will not be able to be trained effectively. Please read and understand the language of this bill.

There are PROVEN ways of stopping the killing in shelters but the mandatory neutering mandated by SB250 flies in the face of what works! If you want to kill more animals, support SB250. If you want to stop the killing in shelters, do your research about what works. We CAN write a law that will stop the killing but SB250 is not it.

HB Livin' said...

i posted this comment because i believe all views should be heard. i challenge the commentor to say what she feels WOULD work.

you rattle on about why this bill is bad, yet you offer NO alternative. why not?

"There are PROVEN ways of stopping the killing in shelters"

list them and start them in action. i'd love to hear them.

you have failed to post a logical argument to why this law shouldn't be passed. you say things wihtout proof. of course, service dogs are treated differently, as they have always been (since becoming established).

if you want to bitch about this..come up with a better solution!

thanks

Geraldine Clarke said...

I got a message that my reply was too long to be processed and another one that my message was waiting to be processed. I apologize if my comments will be have to be processed twice but I will re-post my original message in two segments. I really want to try to get both sides of this issue to work together to save animals.

My original message, part 1:


Well, since you ask, Bill Bruce in Calgary has turned that city (which had had great problems with homeless animals) into a No-Kill reality. Many cities that are adopting Nathan Winograd's No-Kill methods are doing the same. The answer is education, extensive out-reach, readily available low-cost neutering facilities, helping people with animal problems instead of demonizing them with high fines and fees and even MORE education. Do your homework about the places where they have learned how to stop the killing. The methods used are too lengthy to go into here.

We have made GREAT strides in the last few decades in reducing the number of animals killed in shelters but killing even one adoptable animal is one animal too many, of course, so we must do even more. However, MSN (mandatory spay/neuter) laws have always proven to be counterproductive. The kind of people who dump animals, dump them even faster when faced with high fines and license fees. They've found that out in Los Angeles, Albuquerque, Santa Cruz, Dallas, etc., etc., etc.. (Yes, Santa Cruz, too. Mancuso claims its law is a success because the published statistics were fudged but a careful analysis of the real figures was done by an accomplished statistician, Angie Niles, which proved that the Santa Cruz law is also a failure. You can google her report if you don't believe me.)

And you must not have read the text of SB250 - there are NO provisions to exempt service dogs or other working animals. Places like the Assistance Dog Institute (where I was a volunteer when I lived in Sonoma) would no longer be able to breed the wonderful animals who do such great work for people in need. ADI originally tried to train rescued animals for the work but their graduation rate was extremely low. When ADI started carefully breeding dogs for their program, the success rate soared and many more service dogs could be provided to the disabled community. (And those of you who think that "using" dogs is wrong would never meet happier animals than those I worked with at ADI.)

Geraldine Clarke said...

Part 2:
And you must not have read the text of SB250 - there are NO provisions to exempt service dogs or other working animals. Places like the Assistance Dog Institute (where I was a volunteer when I lived in Sonoma) would no longer be able to breed the wonderful animals who do such great work for people in need. ADI originally tried to train rescued animals for the work but their graduation rate was extremely low. When ADI started carefully breeding dogs for their program, the success rate soared and many more service dogs could be provided to the disabled community. (And those of you who think that "using" dogs is wrong would never meet happier animals than those I worked with at ADI.)

And I'm not just "bitching"; I'm mad as hell. I really, really want to stop being angry and stop spending all my free time fighting Ms. Mancuso's misguided bills (which I have been doing for four years now) and use that time and energy instead to work with the legislators I've met in the AB1634 and SB250 fights and craft a law that will REALLY save animals.

Geraldine Clarke said...

Part 3(the final one and I really mean it about hoping we can work together):

I'm always fostering cats for a rescue I work with and I could do so much more of that work if I didn't have to spend so much time trying to stop misguided legislation. (BTW I'd foster dogs, too, but my local limit laws make that illegal. Getting rid of unreasonable limit laws is one of the things that helps to reduce shelter populations.)

I would really love to work with you to save shelter animals. We CAN do it if we look at the facts about what actually works to make that a reality. So much unnecessary hostility has been generated by Ms. Mancuso's bills. The people on both sides of this issue want to save animals (and the people who are producing all those unwanted animals have no idea of what we are arguing about and will go on doing so whether or not SB250 passes.) We need to spend our time in getting to those people instead of fighting each other.

HB Livin' said...

I agree things need to change. the public attitude needs to change.

today i called my rep & urged him to vote on this. this is a step in the right direction of awareness & responsibility. sure some things may not be agreeable to everyone, but what bill has EVER had that? none.

i read the bill. section L talks specifically about exempt animals such as service, guard, hunter, police ect.
section F2 talks about low cost options for low income people.

i don't see much i disagree with. all pet animals (with certain exceptions) should be fixed.

if you feed ferals or strays on your property without getting them fixed, you ARE contributing to this problem. if you care enough to feed them, care enough to fix them so they are breeding machines without any hope of freedom. i wouldn't have a problem with fixing animals i fed. there a MANY low cost options to help with spay. i've used 1 myself.